The Orange Typewriter joins the Springsioux Tribe

Springsioux
Alisa Gusakova
Rings by Springsioux
Photo by Sime Eskinja
The orange typewriter welcomes Pierre-Antoine De Myttenaere and Alisa Gusakova, founders of the lifestyle brand Springsioux. This summer they will launch a collection made by a ‘tribe’ of artists from Paris and beyond. Drawing from street art, tattooing, after hours culture, and music (with a mix-tape on their website). Springsioux began with an update on the rock and roll essential, the black t-shirt, adding creatures from Native American lore.

  Springsioux’s 2012 line features silk t-shirts, fish leather bracelets, and a capsule collection combining silver and fur by Orange Typewriter Guest and fur master Quentin Veron.

S&D: How did you assemble the tribe?

PA: Springsioux began with a t-shirts line I put together when I was playing in a new wave band. Alisa managed our Russian tour and during this trip we shared ideas and realized we had a lot in common. We found a perfect balance between creative energy and business so we decided to partner up and launch a jewelry line.

Our friend Photographer Pierre Yves Toledano was also with us during this Russian tour that gave birth to a team with the motto: work hard, party harder. 

Springsioux
Pierre-Antoine live in
St. Petersburg. 

S&D: What have been some influences on the style of Springsioux?

Alisa: We are influenced by underground subcultures linked to heavy metal, and by native American and Mexicans artwork. We try to combine both universes into something unique using unusual combinations of material like fish-leather and silver…I fell in love with fish-leather several years ago in Russia: we can credit Alexander Wang as a major inspiration for our work with this material.

Springsioux
the Tribe’s DJ Victoria Frangie

S&D: Has your personal look influenced Springsioux or visa versa?

Alisa: Our first creations were what we wanted to wear but couldn’t find in other brands. We don’t really think about what people are expecting to buy, we focus more on creating pieces we love. Springsioux gives us the opportunity to enhance and share our wardrobe and our personal style.

S&D: Tell us more about the Tribe’s Paris roots.

P.A: As the months passed, we gathered talented people who believed in us. DJ Victoria Frangie became our brand ambassador. Music video director Aurélien Offner joined the tribe, and we’ve recently started a collaboration with tattoo artist Eddie Czaicki on a t-shirt line which will be released in September. We are also currently working with fur designer Quentin Veron on an accessory line. As we collaborate we strengthen and expanded the tribe. This is what makes these projects totally exciting.

Springsioux
“Springsioux is a tribe, weaving through the crowd,
remaining alive in the darkness…”

S&D: The brand’s motto is ‘alive in the darkness’ describe what this means to you:

P.A: Springsioux has evolved in the shadows. We are not interested in the mainstream culture; our goal is to create something different and powerful, something for a person to wear while doing his/her own thing. We’re fighting against conformity and creating a community while we’re at it…Springsioux is a tribe, weaving through the crowd, remaining alive in the darkness.

Springsioux
Interview by Charlie Daly

Next time: The Orange Typewriter crosses the Atlantic and Lake Michigan to meet Craig Engel and Lorrisa Julianus: partners on stage, in the studio and in life.

Hannah Day flies over to the orange typewriter

Hannah--Day

 
    California born, artist and environmentalist Hannah Day came to Paris this year to study French and to draw trees. A constant in Hannah’s work on both sides of the Atlantic, trees have extended their roots in this young artist’s life far beyond her sketchbooks. As a fruitarian, Hanna relies on trees for everything she eats. And she helps save the trees she paints by doing much of her work on used shopping bags and postcards. Her environmental concerns, green lifestyle, and artistic passions are spiritually grounded, if that’s the right word, in Hannah’s practice of ‘Flying’ yoga. Hannah is currently working on her first children’s book.

S&D: Why do you draw trees instead of sunsets, skyscrapers, or jam-jars? 

H.D: Well, I didn’t really choose to draw trees. In fact, I resisted the idea for quite a while, beginning when I did one drawing in my freshman year of college in which trees were an essential element; I was hesitant because trees are a common subject… It ended up being the first drawing I ever completed that I felt was truly successful. At the time I thought my drawing’s success was despite the trees, not because of  them. I realized that trees are only cliché the way a naked woman’s figure is cliché; artists have returned to them over and over for a reason.

Hannah--Day

S&D: You are a fruitarian, what role has this played in your artistic life?

H.D: It was when I began eating a diet based on raw, whole fruit that I truly became enamored with trees, and as a result, came to accept my habit of drawing them. Their being the source of every piece of succulent sustenance that I consume suddenly brought trees to life in a whole new way. My drawings became illustrations of my reverence for these beings that generously dispense bushels of delicious food. Fruit trees produce more calories per acre than any other crop, and are the only crop that gives back to the soil. At the same time, their branches provide shade and shelter to many a creature, including us, and their roots wind through the earth beneath them to offer stability to the surrounding terrain…The beauty of the simple existence of something so gracious as the fruit tree makes me feel an inexplicable joy which I feel may have saved my work from rolling down a more cynical road.

Hannah--Day

S&D: But Paris is a big, dirty city…why paris?

H.D: It was kind of something that I had always planned on doing. Ever since I started studying French I have wanted to be immersed in the language. I have changed a lot since I originally made those plans; there is very little about the lifestyle here that fits with my current love of the sun, nature and fresh produce—but the art remains. There is a creative energy here that is infectious. I feel that one is encouraged in his or her creative endeavors; art is not deemed a selfish use of one’s time, but a way of life, and a way to share one’s life. 
Hannah--Day


S&D: Advice for young painters?


H.D: The best advice I have ever received, as an artist, is to just keep working. Allow yourself to produce bad work—mountains of it—and don’t let it discourage you from continuing to create. My yoga teacher here in Paris once explained that the tradition of Kundalini Yoga believes that not only can we not prevent ourselves from making mistakes, but that we can not stop ourselves from making the same mistake numerous times. We must continue making the same mistake until we learn the lesson that we are intended to glean from finding ourselves in the confounding situation over and over again. The hardest part about being a young artist is trying to find what you want to talk about in your work, how to communicate what is driving you to sit yourself down in your studio, or in your room with your guitar, or in front of your typewriter.  
S&D: Advice for young environmentalists?

H.D: It is physically impossible to live on this planet without affecting the state of it and all of the creatures who live on it. But as with being an artist, the most important thing is not to be discouraged, and more than that, to never ever believe that all that you do, or all that you dream of doing, will be for naught.
Hannah--Day
Artwork courtesy of Hannah Day,
all rights reserved.
Interview by Charlie Daly

Next Time:  Next week, poet Margaux Curcuru returns to interview Stacks & Dropper’s Charlie Daly about the orange typewriter series, sex, swimming, and Oscar Wilde.

Alizé Meurisse: 2 paintings, 1 collage, and an ashtray

The orange typewriter series is proud to welcome painter, novelist, hip-hop lyricist, and Coup de Coer recipient, Alizé Meurisse. Her work has been shown in Paris and London, on canvasses that “engulf the viewer,” as Editions Alia editor Gérard Berréby put it, and touch themes from “travesty to sacrilege.” She has published two novels with Editions Alia: Pâle Sang Bleu (nominated for the Prix de Flore), and Roman à Clefs–all before her 26th birthday. Work from Alizé’s 2011 exhibition at Paris’ Galerie Nuke is available in book form as Pen Knife, which gets its title from the couto Swiss like versatility of this brilliant and busy young artist. 
Alize--Meurisse--Pete--Doherty--Grace--Wastelands--album--cover
‘Salomé’ was shown in London’s Cob Gallery
and appears on the cover of ‘Grace/Wastelands’
Pete Doherty’s  first solo album.


S&D: Which grabbed you first: painting or writing, are you formally schooled in either? 

A.M: as a child I used to draw a lot, as a teenager I wanted to be a painter… I left school behind when I was 19 (after two years of “classe préparatoire”)…haven’t been to art school or followed any writing course, I’m just curious and enthusiastic… and ambitious I guess! I mean I love writing and painting, I couldn’t stop, I need it.
Alize--Meurisse--untitled
Untitled
S&D:  Could you give us the meaning of your first name?
A.M: It’s the name of a tropical wind, from the Caribbean… but it’s also the name of a drink which is mentioned in some hip hop tracks (tupac, dre, etc), to New Yorkers it sounds like quite a “thug” name. 
There’s also a french pop singer who’s called “Alizee” (spelt with two “e”s though!) her hit single “Lolita” came out when I was about 14 so I got teased a bit. 
I think your name says a lot about you, I like mine. 
My brother calls me Zey.

S&D: Rimbaud or Baudelaire? (you have to choose…)

A.M: I like Both. I choose Verlaine!

Alize--Meurisse--petit--mort
‘Petite Mort’
from Alizé’s ‘Second Sex’ series

S&D: Why Paris?

A.M: Because I was born here…well, I’m from a Paris suburb (92) and moved to Paris when I was 10.

S&D: Picasso used to make his girlfriends and wives read the Marquis de Sade; is there a book you would prescribe to your friends and lovers?

A.M: I don’t know… there’s nothing I feel people absolutely HAVE TO have read, on the contrary I’d get bored with people who think and do just the same as I do. I’m interested in what my friends and lovers can make me discover!
Alize--Meurisse
Discover Alizé at
http://alizemeurisse.com/
Photo by Siegfried De Turckheim

                                                                                       
                                                                      
Next time: Tree-sketcher, environmentalist, and flying Yogi, 
Hannah Day visits the orange typewriter.
Alize--Meurisse--ashtray
Ashtray by Alizé,
interview by Charlie Daly
Photos Courtesy of
Alizé Meurisse.
Read the typewritten Draft!